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Filter: Burnham 8th Floor
 

8:00am

TUTORIAL: Preparing for Stampede
    Monday July 16, 2012 8:00am - 12:00pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    TUTORIAL: Preparing for Stampede: Programming Heterogeneous Many-Core Supercomputers

    ABSTRACT: The next round of supercomputing technology will feature heterogeneous architectures with many-core CPU and accelerator technologies. In the coming year, the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) will deploy a 2PF Intel Sandy Bridge, 8PF Intel MIC Architecture hybrid cluster name Stampede, featuring hundreds of thousands of heterogeneous cores. This tutorial will introduce experienced C/C++ and Fortran programmers to techniques essential for preparing their scientific applications for future systems. These future architectures will support wider and more powerful SIMD vector units, so the first half of the tutorial will focus on understanding modern vector programming, compiler vectorization reports, solutions to common vectorization problems, and new ways to employ new SIMD instructions. The second half of the tutorial will concentrate on using OpenMP directives and tasks to exploit the parallelism inherent in high core-count processors and heterogenous systems. Hands-on exercises will be conducted. Motivating examples from Intel's future MIC Architecture will be presented.

    PREREQUISITES: Parallel programming experience

     



    Speakers

    Type Tutorial


1:00pm

TUTORIAL: High-Throughput Computing With XSEDE
    Monday July 16, 2012 1:00pm - 5:00pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    ABSTRACT: High-throughput computing is not as well understood as some of the other types of computing available on XSEDE resources. However, the Purdue Condor Pool and OSG are very good resources for certain types of computational scientific research and can provide a large number of compute hours if the type of research computing required is a good match. This tutorial will cover the concept of high-throughput computing, the types of jobs that might be a good "match" for the Purdue Condor Pool and OSG resources, as well as a background in the Condor software that provides the main job submission and workflow mechanism for both resources. Additional details will be provided on how both the Purdue Condor Pool and OSG are set up. Example serial code, as well as access to both the Purdue Condor Pool and OSG for a "hands-on" workshop, will be provided in the second half of the tutorial.

    REQUIRES: Laptop, GSISSH, Web browser

    PREREQUISITES: XSEDE ID on Condor Pool

     



    Speakers

    Type Tutorial


6:00pm

XSEDE Scholars Dinner
 
 

10:00am

EOT: Invited Speaker: Edith Gummer
    Tuesday July 17, 2012 10:00am - 10:30am @ Burnham 8th Floor

    Invited Speaker: Edith Gummer, NSF Program Director, Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR)/ Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL)

    Title: Evaluation in the Extreme Setting: Micro and Macro Challenges and Opportunities

    Abstract: This presentation will focus on the challenges and opportunities in evaluation of learning environments that address complex outcomes of computational literacy and effective analysis of large scale data. The challenges include the design and implementation of assessments of these learning outcomes including the intersection of disciplinary knowledge and computational literacy. Gathering information about the effective elements of multifaceted instructional environments requires the efforts of a team of disciplinary and educational researchers. Evaluations need to include both quantitative and qualitative aspects to ascertain not only how effective design and implementation of courses and programs improves student learning, but by whom and under what circumstances. Course instructors and the educational researchers and evaluators with whom they work should consider the opportunities they have link with others who are working in this area to facilitate the use of common instruments and processes so that resources and findings can be shared across the community.

     


    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


10:30am

EOT: Enhancing Chemistry
    Tuesday July 17, 2012 10:30am - 11:00am @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: Enhancing Chemistry Teaching and Learning through Cyberinfrastructure

    Abstract: In this paper, we discuss strategies used in the Institute for Chemistry Literacy through Computational Science (ICLCS) that have impacted high school teachers and their students from small rural communities in Illinois. The overarching goal of the ICLCS is to infuse high school Chemistry curricula with computational models and simulations in order to increase the content knowledge of both teachers and their students. Schools in rural communities present issues that are closely related to their size and location, but these issues may resonate in larger communities as well. By bringing leading-edge technologies to classrooms and intensive professional development to teachers not only have we impacted student achievement and teacher content knowledge in Chemistry, but we have used technology to improve access and opportunity for this underserved audience. This paper gives an overview of two aspects of the program—the cloud enabled environment designed to deliver a computational chemistry web service for education and the virtual professional learning environment that serves as a community of practice.

     

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


11:00am

EOT: The Role of Evaluation
    Tuesday July 17, 2012 11:00am - 11:30am @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT:The Role of Evaluation in a Large-scale Multi-site Project

    Abstract: The initial role of evaluation in a large-scale multi-site project is presented. The evaluation utilized an educative, values-engaged approach (EVEN) [4]. This paper also presents the evaluation questions and metrics used to structure an evaluation of this scale. The evaluation team has initiated the process of addressing the evaluation questions by including stakeholders in constructing a detailed evaluation matrix, conducting data collection, and regularly presenting formative information to project leads and managers to guide program improvement. This process as well as how this evaluation addresses key issues in evaluating STEM training, education, and outreach while contributing to advances in the field is also discussed.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


11:30am

EOT: Longitudinal User
    Tuesday July 17, 2012 11:30am - 12:00am @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: Longitudinal User and Usage Patterns in the XSEDE User Community

    Abstract: The XSEDE user community is often assumed to be dominated by a (mostly) fixed set of users in a largely static pecking order. This assumption is based primarily on anecdotal experience but often the only quantitative data are the consistent patterns of overall resource consumption observed at many time scales. The XSEDE accounting system offers a unique opportunity to study consumption patterns over time by project teams and individuals. This analysis shows some tendency for larger-scale consumers to remain among the larger-scale consumers; however, the XSEDE user community is much more dynamic than often assumed. In addition, small-scale user behavior over time differs distinctly from large-scale user behavior, with the “long tail” more often comprised of short-lived projects. We define a number of metrics for describing these patterns and consider their implications for the outreach activities and user support within XSEDE and other HPC environments.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


2:45pm

EOT: Computational Science Certificates
    Tuesday July 17, 2012 2:45pm - 3:15pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: Computational Science Certificates for the Current Workforce: Lessons Learned

    Abstract: One of the keys to the future competitiveness of U.S. industry is the integration of modeling and simulation into the development, design, and manufacturing process. A related challenge is to retrain the current workforce in the use of computational modeling to enable its effective use in the workplace. We review our implementation of a new, computational science certificate program aimed at the current workforce in Ohio. The structure of the current program is discussed along with the problems associated with meeting the educational needs of this population.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


3:15pm

EOT:A Blended, Multimodal
    Tuesday July 17, 2012 3:15pm - 3:45pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: A Blended, Multimodal Access eTextBook in Computational Physics

    Abstract: A complete eTextBook with multiple executable elements 

    has been created and Web-based versions have been placed 

    in the National Science Digital Library. The book’s file formats 

    and executable elements are chosen to be platform 

    independent, highly useable and free. While future technologies 

    and operating systems promise improved executable 

    books, the created eTextbook highlights some of the features 

    possible with existing technologies. The prototype eText- 

    Book includes text, computational laboratories, demonstrations 

    and video–based lecture modules.



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


3:45pm

EOT: FutureGrid Education
    Tuesday July 17, 2012 3:45pm - 4:15pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: FutureGrid Education: Using Case Studies to Develop Curriculum for Communicating Parallel and Distributed Computing Concepts

    Abstract: The shift to parallel computing---including multi-core computer architectures, cloud distributed computing, and general-purpose GPU programming---leads to fundamental changes in the design of software and systems. As a result, learning parallel computing techniques in order to allow software to take advantage of the shift toward parallelism is of important significance. To this end, FutureGrid, an experimental testbed for cloud, grids, and high performance computing, provides a resource for anyone to find, share, and discuss modular teaching materials and computational platform supports. 

    FutureGrid advances the education and training in distributed computing for organizations with less diverse computational resources; it accomplishes this through the development of instructional resources to include preconfigured environments for providing students with sandboxed virtual clusters. These can be used for either self-learning or teaching courses in parallel, cloud, and grid computing. FutureGrid’s education and outreach initiatives allow computational frameworks, such as, Google’s proprietary, MapReduce and the open-source Apache Hadoop to be applied to datasets of web scale. The availability of cloud computing platforms offer a variety of programming models, such as Hadoop and Twister, an iterative MapReduce framework, to make it feasible for anyone who wants to explore the data deluge without extensive local or personal investment in cluster computing. 

    FutureGrid provides users with community-driven teaching modules, which provide conceptual principles of parallelism and hands-on practice with parallel computing, in self-contained units, which can be inserted in various environments in multiple curricular contexts. These modules offer an incremental approach to getting interested individuals the exposure to parallelism they will need to become participants in the concurrency evolution. 

    This paper would present a series of case studies for experiences in parallel and distributed education using the FutureGrid testbed. Building on previous experiences from courses, workshops, and summer schools associated with FutureGrid, we present a viable solution to developing a curriculum by leveraging collaboration with organizations. Our approach to developing a successful guide stems from the idea of anyone interested in learning parallel and distributing computing can do so with minimum assistance from a domain expert, and it addresses the educational goals and objectives to help meet many challenges, which lie ahead in the discipline. We validate our approach to developing a community driven curriculum by providing use cases and their experiences with the teaching modules. Examples of some use cases include the following: a NCSA summer school for big data science, hosting a workshop for faculty members of historically black colleges and universities, courses in distributed and cloud computing at universities, such as Indiana University, University of Florida, Louisiana State University, and the University of Piemonte Orientale - A. Avogadro.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


4:45pm

BOF: Hosting Cloud
    Tuesday July 17, 2012 4:45pm - 5:45pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    BOF: Hosting Cloud, HPC and Grid Educational Activities on FutureGrid

    Abstract: FutureGrid is an XSEDE resource which has, at the core of its educational mission, the ability to create consistent, controlled and repeatable educational environments in all areas of computer science related to parallel, large‐scale or distributed computing and networking as well as the availability, repeatability, and open sharing of electronic educational materials. FutureGrid has deployed a distributed platform where educators and students can create and access such customized environments for hands-on activities on cloud, HPC and grid computing. This Birds-of-a-Feather session will provide a forum for users to get informed about the opportunities available to use FutureGrid in education, present user stories describing different ways in which it has been used in classes, and encourage discussion from the participants on features that they would like to see in this infrastructure to support their educational needs. 

    The general format of the BOF includes brief overview presentations to provide context, followed by discussions with attendees, focused on their needs in education and how FutureGrid can help, facilitated by the BOF organizers. The primary target audience for this BOF session draws from attendees of the conference’s typically well-attended EOT track, but the BOF will also be of interest to a broader set of XSEDE users interested in use of a flexible platform for education and training. 

    Overview presentations will describe FutureGrid capabilities supporting educational activities – including the user portal, creating classes and user accounts, available tutorials and community materials, and cloud/HPC/Grid platforms available in FutureGrid, such as Nimbus, OpenStack, and Eucalyptus. Given the increased interest in the use of cloud computing in educational activities, the presentations will describe, in particular, FutureGrid support for user-customized virtual machine appliances which integrate pre-configured software such that educational environments can be easily created, customized, shared among users, and deployed on FutureGrid’s cloud resources, as well as support for users to collaborate on the development of curriculum for classes using FutureGrid.

     



    Speakers

    Type BOF


 
 

10:00am

EOT:Cloud-enabling
    Wednesday July 18, 2012 10:00am - 10:30am @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT:Cloud-enabling Biological Simulations for Scalable and Sustainable Access: An Experience Report

    Abstract: We present our experiences with cloud-enabling an evolutionary genetics learning environment for achieving sustainability and scalability. The project called Pop!World features three major levels: (i) the Gateway module for catering to K-12 students, (ii) the Discovery module for undergraduates and (ii) the Research module for advanced learners and researchers. The Discovery module of Pop!World is currently in use in the introductory Biological Sciences course at UB (BIO 200). The project that began as a design and development of prototype tool for learning and teaching soon faced two major issues: scalability and sustainability. Scalability in our case is about the ability to service thousands of users at a fairly reasonable quality of service. Sustainability is about accessibility and availability beyond the classroom. Learners are often introduced to useful tools and environments during their enrollment in a course. Yet, continued access to the tools beyond the duration of the course is critical for sustaining the learning that happened during the course and to enable experimentation, discovery and application of the knowledge they acquired. Therefore, we used cloud cyber-infrastructure to address successfully the dual issues of scalability and sustainability. In this paper we discuss the details of the cloud deployment of Pop!World and our experiences in using it in an educational setting. The tool is currently deployed on Google App Engine (GAE).

    Significance to XSEDE: We expect the learning model we have developed for Evolutionary Biology simulations can be transformed to disseminate capabilities of XSEDE and to serve as an educational and training model for XSEDE.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


10:30am

EOT:Using Stereoscopic 3D
    Wednesday July 18, 2012 10:30am - 11:00am @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT:Using Stereoscopic 3D Videos to Inform the Public about the Benfits of Computation Science

    Abstract: This paper describes an effort to create and disseminate a series of stereoscopic 3D videos that raise awareness about the value of computational science. While the videos target the general population, including the K-12 community, the audience for this paper includes scientific or technical peers who may be interested in sharing or demonstrating their own work more broadly. After outlining the motivation and goals of the project, the authors describe the visual content and computational science behind each of the videos. We then discuss our highly collaborative production workflow that has evolved over the past decade, as well as our distribution mechanisms. We include a summary of the most relevant and appropriate stereoscopic display technologies for the intended audience. Lastly, we analyze and compare this work to other forms of engagement, summarize best practices, and describe potential improvements to future stereoscopic 3D video production.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


11:00am

EOT: WaterHUB
    Wednesday July 18, 2012 11:00am - 11:30am @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: WaterHUB – A resource for students and educators for learning hydrology

    Abstract: The study of surface water hydrology involves understanding the occurrence, distribution and movement of water on the surface of the earth. Because of human impacts in the form of landuse change, the hydrologic processes at one geographic location may be different than other locations under same or different climatic settings. As a result, a tool that educators and students can use to explore hydrology through observed data and computational simulations is needed. The objective of this paper is to present a prototype model sharing and data exploration tool that users can use for education as well as for research. A GIS-enabled model sharing platform for Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), called SWAT Share, is developed that enables students to not only run model simulations online, but also publish, share and visualize model results to study the impact of land use change on hydrology at watershed scale. SWAT Share is developed as a part of the WaterHUB system that is built by combining Purdue’s HUBZero technology and TeraGrid/XSEDE computation resources. Experience of developing and using SWAT Share in a classroom will be presented and discussed. In addition, the development and implementation plan of another tool, called Hydrology Exploration Tool, will be presented.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


11:30am

EOT:A Learning Outcome
    Wednesday July 18, 2012 11:30am - 12:00pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT:A Learning Outcome Driven Cyber Infrastructure for Thermodynamics Education

    Abstract: The web portal TEST, the Expert System for Thermodynamics (www.thermofluids.net) is a courseware that is being used in Engineering Thermodynamics classes by more than 2000 registered educators around the world. The courseware combines a number of resoures: Tables and charts, a library of animations covering every major topic, rich internet applications for simulating important thermodynamic systems, thermodynamic calculators called daemons (named after Maxwell's daemon) to verify manual solution and pursue what-if studies, and sixteeen chapters multi-media problems and examples. In this work, we present an outcome driven approach to link various resources offered by this courseware to motivate a student to learn. For this purpose, we have associtated 24 learning outcomes to engineering thermodynamics, a two semester course in most universities. For each outcome a fixed number of problems (10) are turned into key problems, designated by a key icon next to the problem. As a student tries to solve a key problem, the outcomes fulfilled by the problem is displayed and the progress made by the student is monitored. On successful solution or after an unsuccessful attmept, a customized recommendation of resources - what to read, what animations to browse, what tables to famiarize, what daemon and RIA to use etc. - is made. A student can keep track of his or her progress and estimate the work required to reach various proficiency level on a given oucome. When a large number of students start using this system, it may become possible to track which resources are more helpful in thermodynamic problem solving. A potential benefit of this approach is direct assessment of student achievements with learninng outcomes, an area of high emphasis from the acredition board.

     

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


1:15pm

EOT: Conducting K-12 Outreach
    Wednesday July 18, 2012 1:15pm - 1:45pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: Conducting K-12 Outreach to Evoke Early Interest in IT, Science, and Advanced Technology

    Abstract: The Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute has engaged for several years in K-12 Education, Outreach and Training (EOT) events related to technology in general and computing in particular. In each event we strive to positively influence children’s perception of science and technology. We view K-12 EOT as a channel for technical professionals to engage young people in the pursuit of scientific and technical understanding. Our goal is for students to see these subjects as interesting, exciting, and worth further pursuit. By providing opportunities for pre-college students to engage in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) activities first hand, we hope to influence their choices of careers and field-of-study later in life.

    In this paper we give an account of our experiences with providing EOT: we describe several of our workshops and events; we provide details regarding techniques that we found to be successful in working with both students and instructors; we discuss program costs and logistics; and we describe our plans for the future.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


1:45pm

EOT: Computing MATTERS
    Wednesday July 18, 2012 1:45pm - 2:15pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: Computing MATTERS: Building Pathways to Cyberinfrastructure

    Abstract: As we prepare students for the 21st century workforce, three of the most important skills for advancing modern mathematics and science are quantitative reasoning, computational thinking, and multi-scale modeling. Computing MATTERS: Pathways to Cyberinfrastructure (1) program, funded in part by the National Science Foundation Cyberinfrastructure Training, Education, Advancement, and Mentoring (CI-TEAM) program, provides opportunities for students to explore and engage in skills needed to advance computational science education through the use of cyberinfrastructure. Computing MATTERS is a program of Shodor (2), a national resource for computational science education. It combines the best of Shodor’s efforts from workshops, apprenticeships and internships. The program provides a continuum of activities from middle school grades through college for students to encounter the excitement of discovery, the power of inquiry and the joy of learning enabled by cyberinfrastructure and advanced technologies. 

    Based on Shodor’s initial demonstration program, Computing MATTERS: Pathways to Cyberinfrastructure is an implementation program that expands on partnerships with universities, community colleges, school districts, community centers, and Sigma Xi to extend Computing MATTERS first throughout the Research Triangle, NC area and then to span the state of North Carolina as the program develops. In Computing MATTERS, “MATTERS” is itself an acronym and has meaning in its own right: Mentoring Academic Transitions Through Experiences in Research and Service. Significant progress has been accomplished to implement Computing MATTERS and to excite and attract students all over North Carolina and beyond to consider study and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The program has proven to attract many individuals from groups underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. 

    Through Computing MATTERS: Pathways to Cyberinfrastructure, Shodor seeks to build self-sustaining local infrastructures, adapting the best features of Shodor’s local initiatives, while expanding the mentor base to include area colleges and universities as well as members of Sigma Xi living and working in North Carolina. 

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


2:15pm

EOT: Motivating Minority Student

2:45pm

EOT: Building a Regional
    Wednesday July 18, 2012 2:45pm - 3:15pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    EOT: Building a Regional Partnership for Computer Science Education

    Abstract: University of California San Diego (UCSD) piloted a new computer science course for the undergraduate curriculum, “Introduction to Computer Science (CS) Principles” in fall of 2010, with significant gains in student interest in CS and performance in the course (when compared with the traditional introductory CS course), particularly among women and minority students. Approved for credit and taught by Dr. Beth Simon, the course was contextual, conceptual, and constructivist in its approach to programming; building interest and enthusiasm for the “magic” of computing before introducing programming mechanics. This lower division course was designed as part of a revised AP Computer Science sequence for high schools, to be coupled with revised and updated AP tests that include the underlying computing principles. Since AP tests drive high school curriculum, their revision has the potential to significantly change the way that computer science is introduced to students in high schools nationwide.

    But introducing new courses into a region with many districts and a highly diverse student population poses many challenges. The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UCSD conducted an exploratory project to identify and build the collaborative networks necessary to support sustainable change in the San Diego region’s pre-college computer science education programs. This paper reports on SDSC’s activities to engage the diverse stakeholders whose support is critical to successfully introducing and sustaining this new course San Diego County schools. 

    Though the project was spearheaded by SDSC, it involved many other leadership partners from UCSD, other colleges in the region, the San Diego County Office of Education, the San Diego chapter of the Computer Science Teachers Association, district administrators and technology specialists, and high school teachers. 

    The primary activities of this project were identification of key stakeholders within the K-12 and community college school districts serving students in the San Diego County region, meeting with those stakeholders, presenting the case for the course to elected officials identified by district personnel, and development of action agendas to support the establishment of functional partnerships for further collaboration toward project objectives. Those objectives included: 

    • Outline protocols, processes, and decision criteria for strengthening the computer science curriculum in each district; and strategies for using them to support the larger project goals; 

    • Identify key decision makers whose endorsement was needed for district-wide implementation;

    • Identify leaders within districts (teachers, professional development specialists, technology specialists, and administrators) willing to become the first cohort Teacher Leadership Team to introduce the not-yet-but- soon-to-be AP CS Principles course into the San Diego region; and

    • Provide professional development for the leadership team to become familiar with the pilot “Introduction to Computer Science Principles” course launched at UCSD in 2010-2011. 

    This project benefited tremendously from the generous sharing of lessons learned by experienced colleagues from the Los Angeles-based “Into the Loop” project. Their advice helped us better understand the complex challenges to implementation of comprehensive revision of the high school computer science curriculum, and to adapt some of their strategies to create a San Diego regional coalition.

     



    Speakers

    Type Education Outreach and Training Track


5:30pm

BOF: MapReduce and Data Intensive Applications
    Wednesday July 18, 2012 5:30pm - 6:30pm @ Burnham 8th Floor

    BOF: MapReduce and Data Intensive Applications

    Abstract: We are in the era of data deluge and future success in science depends on the ability to leverage and utilize large-scale data. This proposal follows up our successful first meetings in this series of “MapReduce application and environments” at TeraGrid 2011. Further we will use it to kick start an XSEDE forum. It aligns directly with several NSF goals including Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CF21) and Core Techniques and Technologies for Advancing big Data Science & Engineering (BIGDATA). In particular, MapReduce based programming models and run-time systems such as the open-source Hadoop system have increasingly been adopted by researchers of HPC, Grid and Cloud community with data-intensive problems, in areas including bio-informatics, data mining and analytics, and text processing. While MapReduce run-time systems such as Hadoop are currently not supported across XSEDE systems (it is available on some systems including FutureGrid), there is increased demand for these environments by the science community. This BOF session will provide a forum for discussions with users on challenges and opportunities for the use of MapReduce as an interoperable framework on HPC, Grid and Cloud.

     



    Speakers

    Type BOF


 

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